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  #1  
Old 08-25-2006, 08:12 PM
Laure D'Angelo
 
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Default How is Drew during the fall?

I would think pretty cool......
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  #2  
Old 08-26-2006, 12:04 AM
Raven M. Brockriede
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laure D'Angelo
I would think pretty cool......

HAHAHAH!!!!!! I HOPE so!
hey...my birthday is TOMORROW!!!!!!!!!!!!! YAY!!!!!!!!! 18!
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  #3  
Old 08-26-2006, 12:24 AM
Paul R. Coen's Avatar
Paul R. Coen Paul R. Coen is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Madison, NJ
Posts: 140
Smile It depends . . .

I remember a few years back it was well into the 70's during Halloween weekend. Generally, the high temperature in November (and even December) is at least 40. That's not to say it can't get a lot colder, but I find that I only need to wear cold weather clothing for maybe a week out of the year under normal circumstances. Usually in January or February. I'd underpack on the super warm stuff - assuming you either visit home or can have someone send stuff. Then again, it's got to hit about 20F for me to think it's getting cold.

This chart is for New Brunswick, which tends to be a little warmer, but this gives you an idea of the high/low range across a year:
http://www.weather.gov/climate/temp_...ead=1&level=99

Snowfall in this part of NJ tends to be in January/February as well, often with one last good storm in March. I'd worry about footwear -- good boots or something else that can get you over icy patches. Even when the intial plowing/shoveling on campus is good, the melt/freeze cycles in the days after a storm can leave some pretty spectacular icy patches. With some of the sloped paths, it can be a bit exciting. It's really not that bad - but with a bit of snow and ice, you can slip. A pair of Yaktrax walkers that you can slip on over your shoes (usually around $16 if you look around a bit) can help on ice, but I'll warn you that you could graduate without needing them. It really varies from year to year.
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  #4  
Old 08-26-2006, 01:00 AM
Kevin P. Egan's Avatar
Kevin P. Egan Kevin P. Egan is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 249
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There was this awful incident last year on the night of midnight breakfast (before fall finals). It had recently rained and you could still feel the moisture in the air. The combination of the rain and the cold weather meant that pretty much all of the walkways between the dorms and the commons were covered in ice. I stepped out of riker and nearly slid right off the stairwell onto the concrete below. It was a nightmare getting to the commons and back, but sure enough, plenty of people braved it to experience midnight breakfast.

Paul's right in that ice and snow are rarely a problem on the campus. But sometimes the conditions are right to make the campus into a slip and slide before facilities can get on top of it.
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  #5  
Old 08-26-2006, 12:17 PM
Raven M. Brockriede
 
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HMMMMMMMMMMM....i thought you meant cool....not COLD!!!!!!!
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  #6  
Old 08-26-2006, 02:08 PM
Laure D'Angelo
 
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I meant cool and not cold!!!!!!!!!
I didn't ask for a weather report of any kind...
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  #7  
Old 08-26-2006, 03:03 PM
Dia O'Neil
 
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see, when i read your first post, i read "cool" as the figurative meaning, not the temperature meaning as apparently most other people did. way to go ambiguous sentences! score one for tricky semantics!

anyway, drew during the fall = absolutely beautiful. at night when the lamps are lit and the leaves have turned, it's one of the most gorgeous sights you will ever see. that's why i decided to stick around for the fall and go abroad in the spring. in general, fall semester is more laid-back and easy going, at least from what my friends and i have noticed. probably because seniors are still in denial about graduating. heh. spring semester = sucky. so i am running half way across the world to escape. lol.

as for the coldness factor, you dont know cold until you live in central new york [or, you know, vermont] for twenty years. up here we have three seasons: winter, almost winter, and construction. i found jersey winters to be mild at best, and was still wearing shorts and tank tops at the end of november. and it doesnt actually snow at drew. it's more like...occasionally the sky gets a bad case of dandruff.

but i am a snow snob, so dont listen to me. dont worry about a coat til after thanksgiving.

Last edited by Dia O'Neil : 08-26-2006 at 03:07 PM.
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  #8  
Old 08-26-2006, 03:06 PM
Katharine A. Overgaard
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dia O'Neil
as for the coldness factor, you dont know cold until you live in central new york [or, you know, vermont] for twenty years.... but i am a snow snob, so dont listen to me. dont worry about a coat til after thanksgiving.

haha.. yeah. All of the people that say that New Jersey winters are going to be sooo bad should live in a New England state from December to April.. then again, I am a New Englander myself, and I can see what a shock the weather would be for a Floridian or Texan or whatever... hehe.
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  #9  
Old 08-26-2006, 03:08 PM
Dia O'Neil
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katharine A. Overgaard
haha.. yeah. All of the people that say that New Jersey winters are going to be sooo bad should live in a New England state from December to April.. then again, I am a New Englander myself, and I can see what a shock the weather would be for a Floridian or Texan or whatever... hehe.

*grin* i had a texan friend last year, and she would do a "snow dance" when it snowed. she lived in mexico/on the mexican border for most of her life, so she'd never seen it before. her professor actually let her out of class because she was so jumpy and excited. it was pretty funny [albeit obnoxious once she discovered the joy of snow balls].
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  #10  
Old 08-26-2006, 03:10 PM
Katharine A. Overgaard
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dia O'Neil
*grin* i had a texan friend last year, and she would do a "snow dance" when it snowed. she lived in mexico/on the mexican border for most of her life, so she'd never seen it before. her professor actually let her out of class because she was so jumpy and excited. it was pretty funny [albeit obnoxious once she discovered the joy of snow balls].

Ahh, to first experience snow as a college student.... sometimes I wish I lived that life. Then I remember how lovely it is where I grew up, and I don't fret about it any longer. haha
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